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Hi Everyone. I do apologize for my neglect of blogging got the last few months. I have been deeply engaged in my writing and editing. For anyone who has engaged in editing, it is a thankless and seemingly neverending process.

But, finally I have something to offer. I have published two portions of my Table of Animals Project. The summary table and the first chapter, the Sponges, have both been published.

The Table of Animals itself is a table which shows the overall course of human development, and where various animal remedy families exist within that course. It includes a 60 page chart summarizing the different themes of the various groups of animals. This work does not contain any materia medica or detailed descriptions of animals as of yet. Those will be published in an ongoing fashion individually as e books and later as paperbacks.

The first volume of that series, The Sponges, is now available. This small volume ( 36 pages) details the themes of the Sponge Phylum, the materia medica of Sponge remedies, and some cases I have collected. It is now only available as an ebook but likely will be combined with the upcoming Cnidarian and Ctenophore chapter in a physical paperback book.

I do anticipate explaining the Table in an upcoming video blog. It hopefully should be ready soon!

The Table of animals is available for purchase at this website, and the Chapter on Sponges is available here. I would love to hear any feedback on them!

 

The Sarcopterygii have had neither been proven nor triturated. Any member of this group would be a welcome addition to Homeopathy. While Coelacanths are likely to be somewhat difficult to obtain specimens, the lungfish are often interacted with by humans. The Queensland Lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri) would be an ideal candidate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Marbled_lungfish_1.jpg

Since the 1990’s several Chondrichthyes have been proven and triturated, allowing us a reasonable picture of this group. However, several large gaps in out knowledge of the Chondrichtyes still exist.

The greatest gaps in the extant Chondrichthytes is the Holocephali. Currently no members of this family have been either potentised or proven. In the Elasmobranchii, the Squalomorphii, have not been potentised or proven. Of these the dogfish, or Squalidae, would be ideal candidates for proving, due to their close relationship with humans, and the frequent encounter of their egg sacs, called mermaids purses, in tidal ponds.

 

In terms of fossils, the Eugeneodontiformes, Symorida, Xenacanthiformes and Hybodontiformes are all completely unproven and unpotentised, and would all make excellent candidates for proving.

 

Image credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:White_shark.jpg

With only one trituration available, any provings or triturations of Urochordates would be of immense value. Since we have no provings of the Thaliaceae and Larvaceae, they would be a higher priority. A number of species are quite prominent as well, and would make excellent candidates for a proving.

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Edible species of Tunicate, such as Halocynthia roretzi, Styela clava, Microcosmus sabatieri, Pyura chilensis, or Pyura praeputialis would make excellent choices for proving.

Several Tunicates have become invasive species over time in a number of geographic areas, such as the Didemnum and Styela genii. Didemnum vexillum has become smothering in the Georges Bank of North America, likely presenting a profound resonance to issues affecting this region.

 

 

 

 

Image Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunicate#/media/File:Ascidians.jpg

Given the complete lack of provings of Cephalochordates, and the presence of only one trituration, any provings of Lancelets would be immensely beneficial. 757px-branchiostoma_lanceolatum

As the one trituration available comes from the Branchiostoma genus, of the Branchiostomidae, members of the genii Epigonichthys or Asymmetron of the Assymetronidae would be the most sensible targets. With two more provings or triturations we could easily cover all extant genii within this subphyla.

As well, triturations and provings of some of the Cephalochordate fossils such as Cathymyrus species might also prove illuminating.

Since only two Bryozoan remedies exist, provings of any other Bryozoa would be well received. Some particularly interesting Flustrellidra_hispida_2090aspecies would be a nosode made from “Doggers Bank Itch” a condition of chronic dermatitis caused by exposure to Alcyonidum diaphanum. Bugula neritina, a source of anticancer chemicals might also be an interesting choice. The noncolonial bryozoan species, Monobryozoon ambulans. would also be an interesting choice.

 

Image credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Bryozoa#/media/File:Flustrellidra_hispida_2090a.JPG

Brachiopods are one of the most poorly proved phyla, and as such provings of any species would be extremely useful. The Usgs_boulder_brachiopodsCranidae are the highest priority, having no proved members. The Linguidae have only a single trituration, and would also benefit from further provings. The Rhynchonelliformes are the best known Brachiopods, with three remedies, but also could benefit from further provings.

 

Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usgs_boulder_brachiopods.jpg

Ctenophores are so far almost completely unknown within Homeopathy, with only my own trituration proving existing. As such 332px-LightRefractsOf_comb-rows_of_ctenophore_Mertensia_ovuma proving of any Ctenophore would be a very useful addition to the Homeopathic materia medica. Since my trituration was of a Tenticulata, a proving of a member of the Nuda would be the best use of effort.

One interesting species of Ctenophores for proving would be Haeckelia rubra, a species which capture the cnidocytes of Ctenophores. Due to their unusual benthic and symbiotic lifestyle and wormlike bodies, members of the Platyctenida would also be excellent candidates for proving.

Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LightRefractsOf_comb-rows_of_ctenophore_Mertensia_ovum.jpg

Finally!!! The Insects are done. As such I have largely completed the suggested provings of the Lepidoptera. Hope you all enjoy!

While Lepidoptera are indeed the most extensively proven of all Hexapod classes, due to the unique relationship of Lepidoptera with the Plant Kingdom, we still have a significant underrepresentation of Lepidoptera species in the material medica. There are many orders of plants which have no hosting Lepidoptera species either potentised or proven. Provings of any Lepidoptera which hosts on one of these orders would be a wonderful addition to the material medica. A chart of Dictoiledon orders, based 416px-Lycaenidae_0001on Michal Yakir’s work is included below.

 

Magnolids Hamamelids Carophyllids Dillenids Rosids Asterids
Magnoliales

1 Species

Urticales

3 species

Carophyllales
None
Dillenales

None

Rosales

3 species

Solanales

2 species

Nymphales
None
Hamamelidales

Possibly one species

Polygonales

None

Theales

None

Fabales

4 species

Gentianales

1 species

Illiacles

None

Juglandales

1 Species

Plumbaginales

None

Sarracenales

None

Myrtales

None

Scrophulariales

1 species

Piperales

None

Myricales

1 Species

Malvales

None

Malpigiales

1 species

Rubiales

None

Laurales
1 Species
Fagales

3 species

Curcubitales

None

Euphorbiales

None

Lamiales

None

Aristolochiales

None

Primulales

None

Sapindales

1 species

Verbenales

None

Ranunculales

None

Ericales

None

Rhamnales

1 species

Dipsacales

2 species

Papaverales

None

Ebenales

None

Cornales

None

Campanulales

None

Salicales

1 Species

Santalales

None

Asterales

1 species

Capparales

3 species

Celestrales

None

Umbelliforales

2 species

 

As of yet, no Butterflies have been proven that host within the monocots, gymnosperms, or bryophytes. Within the monocots, amoung the Magnolids the Nymphales, Iliacles, Piperales, Aristolochiales, Ranunculales and Papaverales have no provings. Amoung the Hamamelids the Hamamelidales have only one tenuous proving. The Carophyllids have no provings whatsoever. Within the Dillenids the Dilleniales, Theales, Srraceniales, Malvales, Curcubitales, Primulales, Ericales and Ebenales all have no proven members. Within the Rosids noe species hosting upon the Myrtales, Euphorbiales, Cornales, Santalales or Celestrales are known. And within the Asterids no proven members host within the Gentianales, Rubiales, Lamiales, Verbenals or Campanulales are available.

Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lycaenidae_0001.jpg

The Hexapods, despite having a wonderfully large number of proved remedies, still have a large number of Orders which are entirely unproven. A list of the orders with and without provings is given below in chart form.450px-Macrothylacia_rubi_caterpillar_with_parasitoid_larvae_-_Niitvälja_bog

 

Hexapod Class Classes with Proved Members Classes without proved members
Collembola None Entomobryomorpha

Poduromorpha

Symphypleona

Protura None All families unrepresented
Diplura None All families unrepresented
Apterygotes Thyansura Monura,

Archaeognatha

Paleoptera Emphemoptera
Odonata
Palaeodictyopteroidea
Neoptera
Exopterygotes Dermaptera

Orthoptera

Mantoidea

Caloneurodea

Titanoptera

Embioptera

Zoraptera

Phasmatodea,

Protorthoptera

Plecoptera

Grylloblattodea

Mantophasmatodea

Dictoptera Blattoidea

Mantodea

Isoptera

Phasmatodea

Notoptera

Paraneoptera Hemiptera

Phthiraptera

Psocoptera

Thysanoptera

Endopterygota Coleoptera

Hymenoptera

Neurotoptera, Megaloptera, Raphidioptera, Strepsiptera
Mecopterygota Siphonoptera

Diptera

Mecoptera

 

Amphismenoptera Lepidoptera Trichoptera

 

 

Thankfully most of the larger insect orders have proven members. However many major orders are still completely unproven. The Collembola, Protura and Diplura all remain unproven, with only a single proven remedy being available from the Apterygotes, and the Monura and the Archaeognatha being unreprepresnted. The Plaeoptera lack provings of the extinct Paleodictyopteroidea. The Exopterygotes lack provings of the Caloneurodea, Titanoptera, Embioptera, Zoraptera, Phasmatodea, Protorthoptera, Plecoptera, Grylloblattodea and the Mantophasmatodea. The Dictoptera lack provings of the Isoptera, Phasmatodea, and Notoptera. The Paraneoptera lack provings of the Psocoptera and Thyansoptera.

 

The Endopterygotes lack provings of the Neuroptera, Megaloptera, Raphidioptera and Strepsiptera. The Mecopterygotes lack provings of the Mecoptera, with Siphonoptera having only the most scanty information. The Amphismenoptera lack any provings of the Trichoptera.

Provings in any of these areas would go a considerable way towards advancing knowledge of the Hexapods as a whole.

While Lepidoptera are indeed the most extensively proven of all Hexapod classes, due to the unique relationship of Lepidoptera with the Plant Kingdom, we still have a significant underrepresentation of Lepidoptera species in the material medica. There are Many orders of plants which have no hosting Lepidoptera species either potentised or proven. Provings of any Lepidoptera which hosts on one of these orders would be a wonderful addition to the material medica.

In general terms a number of insects are particularily fascinating. I have listed a few of these below, along with descriptions .

The Tsetse fly, (Glossina species) is a fly which transmits trympanosomes which cause sleeping sickness, and are yet unpotentised and unproven. Given the close relationship of mosquitos and Malaria, a number of malarial infected mosquitoes should be potentised. If possible a female Anopheles mosquito infected with all malarial Plasmodium species should be procured and potentised as well as proven. Such a remedy is likely to have a profound curative effect, similar to that of the Deer Tick made by Alchemists apothecary, which was infected by four pathogens. Another Mosquito borne pathogen which would do well to have potentised is th West Nile Virus, currently spreading throughout North America. One fascinating species of insect to prove would be the Mad honey of the Himalayan cliff bee, Apis dorsata laboriosa. This honey is made from wild Rhodedendron flowers which impart it with relaxant, and at higher doses, hallucinogenic, emetic and muscle weakening properties, as well as causing heart irregularities[i].

 

The Human Bot fly, or Dermatobia honinis, would also be an excellent potential remedy, with its potential to cause subdermal infestations of Humans. As well the Oriental Rat flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, as the natural vector for plague, should also be potentised, ideally a specimen infected with Yersinia pestis. This pathogen, having caused so much death during the course of history, likely has a deep miasmatic imprint which will likely be extremely useful in treatment.

 

[i] Asher, C. Giant Bees make Psychedlic Honey. Dec 3 2014. Curious Meerkat. Online Document Accessed October 18th 2015. http://www.curiousmeerkat.co.uk/short/giant-bees-make-psychedelic-honey/

 

Image Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Macrothylacia_rubi_caterpillar_with_parasitoid_larvae_-_Niitv%C3%A4lja_bog.jpg

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